Category Archives: It’s bigger than football

It’s a high bar, but Dunbar drama tops all in the Carroll/Schneider era

The Seahawks have been NFL drama queens almost from the start of the Pete Carroll/John Schneider era, so it’s never that surprising when some crazy news comes along.

But nothing ever done by the likes of rogues Marshawn Lynch, Richard Sherman and Michael Bennett or chuckleheads Leroy Hill, Percy Harvin, John Moffitt or Malik McDowell could top the situation Quinton Dunbar finds himself in.

Dunbar’s case (alleged robbery) is still working through the system, with conflicting reports (by the same people) of whether Dunbar was involved. We’ll keep following it and see how it turns out, but it certainly is one of the crazier crime stories ever related to the Seahawks. And they have had a few.

Continue reading It’s a high bar, but Dunbar drama tops all in the Carroll/Schneider era

Peter King: A peek at Seattle’s virtual OTAs

Here’s a look at one of the Seahawks’ virtual offseason meetings, courtesy of Peter King.

This spring, the NFL allows two hours of classroom work virtually for veteran players four days per week. The Seahawks as a team meet from 10 a.m. to noon PT four days a week, usually starting with a short team meeting and breaking down into smaller groups—the offense for some play installations, then maybe just the quarterback, tight ends and receivers, and then the tight ends, via video conference. The two-hour session is tightly controlled by director of team operations Matt Capurro, who flashes “time remaining” alerts on the screen as the last half-hour of the session winds down.

Virtual TE meeting
(Clockwise from top left) passing game coordinator Dave Canales, Greg Olsen, TE coach Pat McPherson, Will Dissly, Luke Willson, Jacob Hollister, Justin Johnson.

The scene: Seattle’s tight-end room, with two coaches and five veterans, stretches over three time zones and five states, connected by Zoom videoconference.

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Carroll: Prep time ‘gonna be a very big issue’

Draft logo 2020After a virtual draft dictated by mandated social distancing during this pandemic, Pete Carroll and John Schneider said they wanted to add mature, experienced players who can learn quickly and will require less time than most to prepare for the NFL.

As Schneider said, “It’s been important for us to try to acquire players that seem to be a little bit ahead of the curve from a learning standpoint in this current environment that we’re in.”

That naturally leads to the next question: Just how little time will they have to prepare for the season? And how much time do they need?

“That’s gonna be a very big issue,” Carroll said.

Continue reading Carroll: Prep time ‘gonna be a very big issue’

Will fear of second wave scuttle the season?

CoronavirusClearly, the return of sports is not significant in the face of a deadly pandemic that requires us to cease our normal lives in order to keep each other healthy. But the return of sports will be important because it will signal the re-normalization of society and thus the presumed passing of the coronavirus.

The question we all want answered and for which there is no answer yet: When might that happen? July? October? Next year?

And, if we have to repeat social distancing every few months, should/will the 2020 season even be played?

Continue reading Will fear of second wave scuttle the season?

If we flatten the curve, maybe ‘normal’ will return in July

CoronavirusThe COVID-19 pandemic has killed thousands around the world and will kill thousands more. It has changed the way we all live — for now, if not forever. It’s obviously so much bigger than football and sports, which mean nothing in the face of a deadly worldwide crisis.

That said, the sports world is doing everything it can to help. Among the first athletes to do so was Russell Wilson, who (with wife Ciara) is helping to contribute 10 million meals to those in need. Drew Brees and his wife are giving $5 million to hard-hit Louisiana to combat the virus. Many others are contributing as well, and athletes everywhere have joined the PSA calling for people to stay home and help flatten the curve.

Continue reading If we flatten the curve, maybe ‘normal’ will return in July

As coronavirus empties arenas, what will the NFL do?

CoronavirusNine years ago, NFL owners and players were negotiating a new CBA — and the start of the league year was delayed four months.

Now, with another CBA extension on the line, it’s possible the league year will be postponed again — for completely unrelated reasons.

The coronavirus pandemic has created a fearful environment in the U.S. (and the world) that has not existed since the days and weeks after Sept. 11, 2001. Even then, sports events were delayed for just a week as the nation grieved and tried to process what had happened.

This is very different.

Continue reading As coronavirus empties arenas, what will the NFL do?

Pete Carroll’s guys take on the owners

NFLPA logoIf they thought about it enough, some NFL owners would be irked at Pete Carroll that the CBA negotiations have not yet resulted in their desired deal.

Why would they be mad at a coach who has nothing to do with it? Because some of the key players who are challenging the owners’ proposal grew up in Carroll’s culture in Seattle. He fostered individuality and independent thinking, and former Seahawks Russell Okung and Richard Sherman — along with current Hawk Bobby Wagner — are using the lessons they learned as Seahawks to fight for the best deal they can get the players.

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CHAWK LINES -- Kam & DougThe departures of Kam Chancellor and Doug Baldwin were expected, but it was nonetheless jarring Thursday to see the line: “The Seahawks parted ways with a pair of franchise icons, terminating the contracts of Doug Baldwin and Kam Chancellor.”

John Schneider said: “These are two of the most iconic players in franchise history, and both were instrumental in establishing our championship culture, great examples of competitiveness and leadership on the field and in the community. These legendary players will always be a part of our Seahawks family.”

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CHAWK LINES -- Paul AllenPaul Allen, Seahawks owner and prolific humanitarian, died Oct. 15 at age 65. Here, we collect all of the most significant reports about one of the greatest philanthropists in the history of America.

We put together a list of tributes from coaches and players who thanked Allen for his inspiration, passion, commitment, vision, generosity, genius, humanity, sacrifices and selflessness.

The 12 flags at VMAC and the stadium both flew at half-staff the week after his death.

In the first game Seattle played without Allen, Carroll dedicated the win to the late owner and said the Hawks will continue to play in his honor. The Lions showed great respect by holding a moment of silence in Detroit. The Seahawks are honoring him with a patch (see below) and the city lit up for him the weekend of the first home game after his death as the team honored him in yet other ways.

Saving the Seahawks from moving was one of Allen’s lesser accomplishments in the big picture, as he devoted much of his life and fortune to — among other things — protecting the planet and wildlife, solving Seattle’s homeless problem, researching the brain and artificial intelligence, funding education and promoting the arts.

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Tributes to the late Paul Allen, Seahawks owner and civic superhero

Seahawks owner Paul Allen died Monday at age 65, losing his second struggle against non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Allen, a civic superhero in so many ways, saved the Seahawks from moving in 1997 and led the team to 20 great years that included three Super Bowl appearances.

Here’s what his Super Bowl coaches and current and former players are saying:

Continue reading Tributes to the late Paul Allen, Seahawks owner and civic superhero