Tag Archives: Pete Carroll

Lynch, Ferguson, Blair, Norton star in opener

Logo -- PreseasonPaxton Lynch and Jazz Ferguson made redemptive first impressions, Marquise Blair looked like he could be Seattle’s next great safety, Ken Norton Jr. showed signs of how he is going to fabricate a pass rush and the special teams covered all of the bases.

Those were the top takeaways as Seattle beat Denver 22-14 in the preseason opener Thursday.

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Carroll on Shead: ‘I didn’t feel like he was back’ last year

Training camp logo2When the Seahawks let DeShawn Shead become a free agent last year, rather than tolling his contract as was their right, it seemed like they were just being charitable.

Maybe they were, to some degree, but Pete Carroll also didn’t think Shead was ready to play football.

Shead suffered a torn ACL in the blowout playoff loss in Atlanta to end the 2016 season. Because of that, the Seahawks chose not to tender the restricted free agent in 2017 and instead paid him $1.2 million to rehab almost all season. He got into a couple of games at the end but still apparently was not back to 100 percent in March 2018.

Continue reading Carroll on Shead: ‘I didn’t feel like he was back’ last year

No more big deals on Hawks’ horizon

Salary cap logoBobby Wagner’s signing pretty much ends Seattle’s big-money deals for the foreseeable future. Now the Seahawks find themselves in wait-and-see mode, just like John Schneider and Pete Carroll’s early years in Seattle.

The Seahawks acquired and developed a lot of talent from 2010 to 2013 and were able to pay all of the top guys: Earl Thomas, Kam Chancellor, Marshawn Lynch, Richard Sherman, K.J. Wright, Russell Wilson, Wagner, Michael Bennett, Cliff Avril, Doug Baldwin.

The Seahawks are still counting on Wilson, Wagner and Wright — all of whom got third contracts this year. But the team now needs to see which players, if any, become the next generation of stars in Carroll’s program.

Continue reading No more big deals on Hawks’ horizon

Why Wagner and not Thomas & Clark?

Training camp logo2The season is still over a month away, but the Seahawks already have tallied a bunch of W’s — Wilson, Wright and now Wagner.

With his $54 million deal, Bobby Wagner joined Russell Wilson ($140 million) and K.J. Wright ($15.5 million) as rare “keepers” for a Seattle club that has undergone some major changes over the past two offseasons.

The Seahawks were wise to hand third deals to all three W’s, but some wonder why they got paid and Earl Thomas and Frank Clark didn’t. Why pay a middle linebacker $18 million a year but refuse to pay your star safety and pass rusher, leaving you with no other established standouts on defense?

Continue reading Why Wagner and not Thomas & Clark?

Camp begins with the Wright stuff

Training camp logo2One of the few recent feel-good moves by the Seahawks was the somewhat surprising re-signing of K.J. Wright, the longest-tenured Seahawk at eight years and counting.

The wise old vet disseminated some great wisdom and leadership on the first day of camp, offering some inside optimism about Bobby Wagner’s status, plus some level-headed logic about the Earl Thomas snit and some funny introspection.

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How long will Ansah, Wagner be out?

Logo -- OTAsThe Seahawks do not expect Ziggy Ansah to be ready for the start of the season, and Bobby Wagner does expect to be the highest-paid linebacker by next year.

Those were the top two takeaways from the second day of Seattle’s OTAs, which are missing a number of guys recovering from surgeries and injuries.

Wagner, whose OTA activity consists only of coaching younger players, said he wants to surpass C.J. Mosley’s $17 million a year. “That’s the top (of the) linebacker market,” Wagner said. “That is the standard. And so that is the plan: To break that.”

Continue reading How long will Ansah, Wagner be out?

Phase 3: Hawks need veteran D-linemen

Logo -- Free agencyThe Seahawks are usually very set with their roster by this time of the offseason, having already retained their key free agents, perhaps added a couple and then of course drafted.

But this year is different: They should be very active in the so-called Phase 3 of free agency, because they still have not improved their defensive line.

The Seahawks have ditched their top three pass rushers over the past two offseasons, and the only notable guy they have added to replace them is first-round pick L.J. Collier. And he alone will not add up to a Frank Clark, Michael Bennett or Cliff Avril.

Thankfully, Pete Carroll and John Schneider plan to do more.

“We talk about those phases of free agency,” Schneider said. “There’s basically like three or four different phases, and we’re basically now heading into Phase 3.”

“We’re very much involved with what’s coming up next,” Carroll said. “We’re not done. We’ve got work to do, and we’re excited about what’s coming up. You guys will see in time.”

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A look at roster after special-teams draft

NFL draftWith two first-round selections in this draft, the Seahawks had a chance to be aggressive in trying to replace Frank Clark. Instead, they kept to their usual MO — drafting for volume, their “Seahawky” traits and development.

Pete Carroll already liked his roster and even had said rookies would have a tough time making the team. But that didn’t stop John Schneider from making seven trades and 11 selections in what basically amounted to a special-teams draft.

“We know a lot of these guys are going to be special-teams players; they’ve already done it, they’ve proven it,” Schneider said. “Some of them are projections, but the majority of them, we’ve seen them play on teams.”

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Chasing picks, Hawks reached for Collier (but he could be worth it)

NFL draftThe Seahawks never know what to do with first-round picks, so imagine the problem they had Thursday when they had two of them back to back and their only real goal was to expand the rest of their draft.

The Seahawks had two picks, and yet it felt like they had no plan for them — other than to bail out as much as possible to add more selections. And they didn’t do that very well either, failing to add a Day 2 selection (beyond the one their first-rounder became).

There’s a reason the Hawks usually trade out of the first round: When they stay, they typically use the pick on a second-round player anyway. They’ve now picked five players in the first round since 2011, and four of them have had second-round grades by most draft analysts. The Hawks have to hope L.J. Collier is a better version of Bruce Irvin (a first-round reach who had eight sacks as a rookie).

Continue reading Chasing picks, Hawks reached for Collier (but he could be worth it)

Wilson did not want to play hardball

Salary cap logoMark Rodgers wanted to play hardball with the Seahawks, and Russell Wilson did not.

From Peter King’s podcast: Rodgers, a baseball agent who is used to fully guaranteed contracts, was pushing the cap percentage idea for Wilson’s deal and wanted the quarterback to embrace the “play on the tag” strategy to try to force Seattle to go along with the cap concept.

But the Seahawks were not going for it. And, by the end, neither was Wilson.

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