Category Archives: NFL draft

Building around QB spot: Roster report after the draft

The Seahawks may not yet know who their quarterback will be – Geno Smith, Drew Lock or someone else — but they certainly are building around that position.

For once, the Seahawks played the draft by the book – and the result looks like their best set of rookies in a decade.

They filled all of their most pressing needs except center — adding tackles Charles Cross and Abe Lucas, running back Kenneth Walker, pass rushers Boye Mafe and Tyreke Smith and corners Coby Bryant and Taliq Wooten. They tossed in a pair of receivers/possible return guys in the seventh round.

The Seahawks got proper value for every pick. Cross, Lucas, Walker, Mafe and Bryant look like five foundational players – four who should be starters now or quite soon. Wooten is an intriguing project as well.

Continue reading Building around QB spot: Roster report after the draft

Hawks can have a big Day 2; will it include a quarterback?

The Seahawks did what they needed to on Day 1, finding their new permanent left tackle in Charles Cross.

Now they prepare for a big Day 2, where they have the eighth and ninth picks to start the session, plus No. 72 overall (third round).

They figure to be looking for a possible QB, plus a corner, center, running back, linebacker and edge rusher.

Continue reading Hawks can have a big Day 2; will it include a quarterback?

Draft Day 2022: Hawks get a new left tackle

The Seahawks eschewed drafting outside linebacker Jermaine Johnson, instead filling their void with left tackle Charles Cross.

It’s a redux of 2010, when they drafted Russell Okung to anchor the left side.

Some analysts who know the Seahawks’ penchant for a balanced offense don’t think Cross has the necessary run-blocking skills. But he graded second in the SEC in run blocking last season, per PFF.

No one doubts his pass blocking, as he faced the premier pass rushers in the NCAA and held his own.

Continue reading Draft Day 2022: Hawks get a new left tackle

Will other teams be as ‘pliable’ as Hawks?

It’s no surprise that the Seahawks want to trade down from No. 9 – or that they might be entertaining moving back into the bottom of the first round to get a quarterback.

Those are moves we’ve been projecting in our own mocks leading up to this week’s draft. But the latter might be easier than the former.

John Schneider stated the obvious last week when he said, “People know that we’re very open to moving around. We’re pliable.”

But will any teams have incentive to trade up to No. 9? Which players would be targets?

Continue reading Will other teams be as ‘pliable’ as Hawks?

Can Hawks finally recharge power core?

When the Seahawks were considered annual contenders, from 2012 to 2017, they had a core of 9-10 stars. Seven of them were on defense.

As they embark on a rebuild, the big question is: How far away from that kind of nucleus are they right now? And how much closer can they get through the upcoming draft?

Continue reading Can Hawks finally recharge power core?

This draft’s template was created in 2010

In some ways, it is 2010 all over again for Pete Carroll and John Schneider.

They have a top-10 pick for the first time since that inaugural year – and they need similar positions: a new QB, a left tackle and some defenders to fit a new scheme.

One thing they don’t have that they had in 2010: a second first-round pick to help hasten their franchise rebuild. But that may be coming, too.

We’ll get to the DK Metcalf trade options in a minute. First, let’s revisit a little history to see how Carroll and Schneider might approach this draft as they build the roster again.

Continue reading This draft’s template was created in 2010

Carroll admits it’s a two-year process; no pressure to draft QB

The Seahawks definitely see this rebuild/reset as a two-year thing, and they seem unlikely to take a quarterback with their first pick this year.

Those were our two main takeaways from Pete Carroll’s radio appearances Tuesday.

He also said they want to extend DK Metcalf, they want more pass rushers, they know they are in a quandary at the tackle spots and Chris Carson is no sure thing to play again.

Continue reading Carroll admits it’s a two-year process; no pressure to draft QB

Comp picks no longer a priority for Seattle

John Schneider has stopped playing the comp game.

As the deadline for compensatory signings passed this week, the Seahawks once again ended up with a zero in the comp column. The 2022 draft will be the fourth time in five years that the Seahawks won’t have any comp picks – quite a reversal for a team that used to play that game as much as anyone.

As we wrote last year, Schneider wasn’t getting much out of those picks anyway. But why has his strategy changed?

The quick answer: Seattle has lost few quality UFAs and largely has decided signing veterans to replace departing players is better than angling for a fourth-round pick the next year.

Let’s delve deeper into it though.

Continue reading Comp picks no longer a priority for Seattle

Hawks had a quietly successful offseason

The Seahawks’ offseason might not seem impressive to some, especially with such a limited draft, but John Schneider and the Hawks quietly have done yeoman’s work to refill and improve their roster, and Pete Carroll is justified in expecting his team to be “very, very competitive.”

The Seahawks had few pressing needs in the draft last weekend because they had made sure to get starters at every spot beforehand. The needs they had were for a corner and center to push the incumbents, a reliable third receiver and a left tackle of the future. They hit on three of those (all but the center), closing the second chapter of a solid offseason.

“I thought this offseason was really successful at situating the roster where we felt good going into the draft,” Carroll said after the Hawks had made their third and final pick (the fewest in team history).

Continue reading Hawks had a quietly successful offseason

Draft notes: Is Tre the Russ of corners?

They always say a 6-2 Russell Wilson would have been a first-round pick. John Schneider says the same about Tre Brown, Seattle’s 5-10 fourth-rounder.

“If he was 6-foot-2, he would be picked in the top 10, right? You can see him every weekend running all over the place in the Big 12 with all these receivers and all the speed that’s out there and competing his tail off.”

Pete Carroll said Brown will compete on the outside, despite not having the length these Seahawks typically have favored.

“He played outside throughout his (college) years,” Carroll said after the draft. “Hasn’t played inside as a featured nickel guy, but we know that he would have the ability to do that. The one-on-ones in the Senior Bowl were really indicative of his ability to stick to people. He went against really good receivers, really good one-on-one opportunities, and whether he is playing inside or outside, he’s going to do fine. We’re thinking of him as a corner to play outside. We didn’t draft him as a nickel.”

Continue reading Draft notes: Is Tre the Russ of corners?