Category Archives: Contracts

Are Hawks ‘guaranteed’ to miss April 15 deadline?

Salary cap logoGuaranteed money is the key to any contract, and it’s the most important thing to Russell Wilson in his new deal. It also figures to be the thing that could delay an agreement.

When he signed his first extension in 2015, Wilson became the No. 2 NFL player in average salary ($21.9 million), right behind Aaron Rodgers ($22 million). But he still trailed a handful of quarterbacks in guaranteed money.

With a dozen QBs having gotten new deals since Wilson was paid, he now ranks 15th in guaranteed part of the total deal (36.2 percent) and 17th in guaranteed money per year ($7.9 million) — according to figures compiled by OverTheCap.com.

Those are the two best ways to measure contract values, and Wilson is aiming for the top marks in those categories now. Kirk Cousins has his entire $28 million per year guaranteed, and Matt Ryan has 63 percent of his deal guaranteed, at $18.9 million per year.

Continue reading Are Hawks ‘guaranteed’ to miss April 15 deadline?

Another deadline: Will Hawks pay Wilson top dollar this time?

Wilson signing contractIf the Seahawks were to offer Russell Wilson $105 million guaranteed over three years, it sounds like he might take it.

Just like 2015, Wilson has set a deadline for a new deal — it’s just earlier this time. Unlike 2015, though, he wants to be the highest-paid player in the NFL — no second fiddle to Aaron Rodgers — and have the entire thing fully guaranteed, according to Jake Heaps on 710 ESPN.

But there seems to be a concern that Pete Carroll and John Schneider won’t put their money where their complimentary mouths are.

Continue reading Another deadline: Will Hawks pay Wilson top dollar this time?

Don’t panic: Hawks can easily keep top stars

Logo -- Free agencyThere’s much panic in the streets about whether the Seahawks are going to keep their top four players in 2020, and it has only intensified after pessimistic speculation by NFL reporter Mike Garafolo on 710 ESPN.

If you believe Garafolo (and others), the Seahawks probably won’t re-sign Russell Wilson, Frank Clark or Bobby Wagner before next year. And don’t forget about Jarran Reed, the fourth musketeer in this contract melee.

But here’s the truth of the matter: The Seahawks have the cap space to keep all four on market deals if John Schneider and Pete Carroll want them back, and they can guarantee they keep two of those players in 2020 without any extensions because teams are allowed to use both a franchise tag and a transition tag in the final year of the CBA (which 2020 will be).

Continue reading Don’t panic: Hawks can easily keep top stars

Will Seahawks want to pay Wagner?

Logo -- Free agencyOn the first unofficial day of free agency, the Seahawks suffered three expected losses and prepared to lose longtime stalwarts Earl Thomas and K.J. Wright.

But the biggest — maybe most unexpected — thing they learned: Bobby Wagner is going to cost a lot to keep beyond 2019. After Kwon Alexander and C.J. Mosley get paid this week, Wagner’s price is going to vault beyond $15 million a year.

Continue reading Will Seahawks want to pay Wagner?

Thomas won’t get $15M, and Hawks won’t bid big for Collins, Weddle

Logo -- Free agencyEarl Thomas apparently thinks he can get $15 million a year. But that’s pretty delusional, especially given the glut of good safeties in free agency this year.

Thomas got some big company on the safety market when the Giants decided against tagging star strong safety Landon Collins and Baltimore cut Eric Weddle. The safety class includes some excellent players: Thomas, Collins, Weddle, Tyrann Mathieu, Lamarcus Joyner, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, Adrian Amos, Kenny Vaccaro.

Continue reading Thomas won’t get $15M, and Hawks won’t bid big for Collins, Weddle

Wilson should aim for a three-year deal for $100M guaranteed

Salary cap logoThere never seems to be as much fretting about other franchise quarterbacks re-signing with their teams as there is about Russell Wilson staying in Seattle. For some reason, national media and plenty of fans always seem to think the Seahawks are going to have a tough time keeping Wilson.

Whether it’s some radio joker speculating that Wilson will try to force his way to New York or people thinking the QB will pull a Kirk Cousins and play on the franchise tag until he can leave, everyone has a paranoid theory about why Wilson is a short-timer in Seattle.

The latest speculation is that Wilson might prefer to wait on the new CBA and see how much the NFL’s new gambling and TV deals add to the coffers, so he doesn’t sign a deal that quickly becomes undervalued.

Instead of playing the franchise game, though, he should move straight to Kirk Cousins Strategy Part II and push the Seahawks to give him $100 million fully guaranteed over three years.

Continue reading Wilson should aim for a three-year deal for $100M guaranteed

Hawks have roster flexibility: Here’s a detailed budget

Salary cap logoRight after the Seahawks’ season ended prematurely, we put forth an offseason to-do list that included extending Frank Clark, improving the defensive line, addressing the future of right tackle, re-signing guards, deciding the fate of their linebackers, adding a vet safety and, of course, extending Russell Wilson.

Earlier this month, we also outlined the projected market for Seattle’s free agents — predicting the team would franchise Clark and keep at least one of the guards while probably/possibly losing Earl Thomas, K.J. Wright, Justin Coleman, Mike Davis and Shamar Stephen.

We also listed pass-rush options beyond Clark — as a No. 2 pass rusher should be Seattle’s top outside priority.

If the Seahawks wanted to, they could retain Clark and at least one guard; extend Wilson, Bobby Wagner and Jarran Reed; and still have around $20 million for other moves.

Here’s a detailed look at how Seattle could accomplish all of that:

Continue reading Hawks have roster flexibility: Here’s a detailed budget

Projected market for Hawks’ free agents

Salary cap logoRussell Wilson could be guaranteed $100 million and Frank Clark $50 million in new deals, according to contract expert Joel Corry, who also laid out the possible markets for several other Seahawks in a conversation with John Clayton on 710 ESPN.

Per Corry, Wilson figures to hit $35 million APY (as we projected) if he signs an extension this year, Clark will aim for $20 million (if not franchised at around $17 million), K.J. Wright could get more than $7 million, and D.J. Fluker, J.R. Sweezy and Justin Coleman all could merit around $5 million on the open market.

All of those amounts, except Wilson’s, would be more than the Seahawks are expected to be willing to pay. But the markets for Wright, the guards and Coleman might not hit those figures either, Corry acknowledged.

Continue reading Projected market for Hawks’ free agents

Super Bowl weekend notes: Clark & Wilson ready for 2019

Frank ClarkRight after the Super Bowl, Frank Clark was ready to get started with the Seahawks again: “Let’s get this paperwork (i.e., contract) done so we (can) go on this hunt. I’m tired of the same results.” The Seahawks have been in the playoffs in three of Clark’s four seasons, but it’s nice to see he is aiming higher — and wants to get there with the Seahawks. Now we just have to wait and see how that paperwork turns out.

Speaking of contracts: Talks have not yet begun between John Schneider/Matt Thomas and Russell Wilson’s agent, Mark Rodgers. But that’s no surprise. Those negotiations are not likely to occur until at least May. Meanwhile, right after the Super Bowl, Wilson tweeted: “2019. Going to be a special year.”

Continue reading Super Bowl weekend notes: Clark & Wilson ready for 2019

Pass-rush options aren’t limited to Clark

Salary cap logo“Business is business so you gotta pay me.” — Frank Clark

The offseason has begun for all but two teams, and football is now in business mode — as Richard Sherman and Frank Clark tweeted recently.

It has been assumed that the Seahawks will keep Clark, their only legit outside pass rusher, via a contract extension or the franchise tag. Pete Carroll confirmed that thought in December when he told 710 ESPN, “He ain’t going anywhere. We aren’t losing him.”

But Carroll also admitted, “We’ve got to figure (the contract) out somehow. It’s a big issue.”

What if the issue is too big? What if John Schneider decides that Clark, who garnered 14 sacks while playing through a bunch of injuries in 2018, is not worth a long-term investment at $17 million APY or more? What if Schneider thinks he can get an equitable pass rusher for closer to $10 million? Or two rushers for the price of Clark?

Continue reading Pass-rush options aren’t limited to Clark