CHAWK LINES -- Cowboys at HawksEarl Thomas sat out a couple of practices and Pete Carroll was evasive in his explanation, calling it a “personal” issue. That led to fair speculation that the Hawks might be talking trade. But Dallas denied it was talking with the Hawks again, and then Thomas basically declared he was playing against his favorite team.

Russell Wilson has a hamstring injury but says he’s “ready to go.” Meanwhile, Ethan Pocic is out, with J.R. Sweezy moving to left guard as D.J. Fluker returns at right guard. Justin Britt (shoulder) is expected to miss more than just one game, meaning Joey Hunt will start at center. It also sounds like Doug Baldwin will be out several more weeks.

On defense, Bobby Wagner said he will start vs. the Cowboys after doing the “grown-up” thing and sitting out Week 2 (he watched the game with Cliff Avril and Kam Chancellor). Mychal Kendricks could be available as his suspension appeal continues to be reviewed by the NFL — but he is questionable with an ankle injury.

Since 1990, 0-2 teams have made the playoffs just 12 percent of the time. But an 0-2 team has made it in each of the past five years. Seattle did it in 2015.

Seattle has a nine-game winning streak in home openers on the line vs. Dallas.

Carroll said his impatience has run up against his desire to run the ball in the first two games. “Got a little bit impatient and threw the ball more than we needed to,” he said. And he also further explained the Chris Carson “benching.”

The Seahawks are not running much beyond first down — and they are failing miserably on first down anyway. That might explain why PFF ranks the O-line 29th in the NFL (PFF has a mixed reputation, especially regarding their grades, so take this as you wish).

Lots of talk about whether Carroll and Brian Schottenheimer are trying to rein in Wilson, but the first TD drive in Chicago occurred because Wilson changed two calls that turned into huge plays by Tyler Lockett — and Carroll said Wilson has more freedom than he has ever had.

Also lots of people with the derisive “Hire Bevell” call after Schottenheimer’s offense has not done any better through two games. But Carroll admitted he messed up Schotty in the third quarter in Chicago. In the troubled first half of that game, we graded Schotty 3 for 5 (Wilson messed up the sixth drive so we can’t grade the play calls).

Schottenheimer said, “I need to be better, and I will be.” He also hilariously quipped: “You get a lot of thoughts and advice as a playcaller, not just from Pete but from everybody — until it’s third-and-22 and you are backed up on your 1-yard line and you are like, ‘Hey, guys, what do you like? … Hello? Hello?'”

Wilson also said he had no issues with the coaches even though they burned a timeout after the QB had checked to a different play. Wilson called it “no big deal. Coach can always call timeout and do his thing.”

On a positive note, Will Dissly has been one of the league’s surprise rookies through two games.

This is not the defense Ken Norton Jr. expected to have, but he has adjusted and found guys like Austin Calitro to step up.

Carroll and Norton liked the three-safety package they used in Chicago and sound like they will try to use it more.

Shaquill Griffin, who had two picks in Chicago, said brother Shaquem “just needs to relax.”

Frank Clark stacks up well against the best pass rushers in pure sack numbers (but remember he also played with Cliff Avril and Michael Bennett for most of that time).

The Tom Johnson debacle came to a close when he returned to Minnesota. Carroll said they didn’t want to lose Nazair Jones or Poona Ford. Kinda reminds us of Dwight Freeney last year, though not nearly as much of a black eye to the franchise.

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One thought on “”

  1. 2.1 or not, they’re giving up too soon. Two 3-yd runs puts RW in a 3rd-and-4, which favors the QB. Two 2.1’s gives him 3rd and a short 6, which is a heck of a lot better than the 3rd-and-8+ they’ve been looking at.

    The point is that you don’t have to be great at the run for it to be effective.

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