Why waive Glowinski?

Logo -- Los AngelesWhy Mark Glowinski?

That’s what some fans are asking after the Seahawks surprisingly waived the third-year guard among their moves Saturday — while putting Kam Chancellor on IR and calling up practice-squad linebacker Kache Palacio and cornerback Mike Tyson.

Chancellor had languished on the 53-man roster ever since he was injured against Arizona five weeks ago. With injuries to Bobby Wagner and K.J. Wright, the Seahawks need potential reinforcements at the position.

Glowinski was one of the few players who could net the Hawks any cap space. As a third-year guy, his $615,000 salary was not guaranteed (only vets with four years or more who started the season with the team are guaranteed). Waiving him gave the team $108,529, enough for them to promote Palacio and Tyson.

The Seahawks obviously are very thin at guard now. With Oday Aboushi on IR as well, Jordan Roos and Matt Tobin are their backups to Luke Joeckel and Ethan Pocic.

They might be hoping Glowinski clears waivers and returns to them next week or whenever Wagner and Wright are healthy. Odds are though that some team will claim the 2015 fourth-round pick who had started 18 games the past two years.

With Glowinski gone, the only players left from Seattle’s eight-player 2015 draft class are Frank Clark and Tyler Lockett (they also traded their first-round pick for Jimmy Graham that year).

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One thought on “Why waive Glowinski?”

  1. Glowinski is part of pattern we’ve seen with other young Seattle offensive lineman (Bailey, Gilliam, Nowak, and — likely — Fant): Overrate a player, invest coaching resources in him, start him before he is ready (which would likely be never), then sour on him when the original judgment turns out to have been faulty.

    I call this the Sweezy Effect, wherein one success makes the staff believe that it can continuously catch lightning in a bottle.

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